Download A Companion to Irish Literature, Volume One & Two PDF

That includes new essays through foreign literary students, the two-volume Companion to Irish Literature encompasses the whole breadth of Ireland's literary culture from the center a while to the current day.

  •  Covers an extraordinary old variety of Irish literature
  • Arranged in volumes masking Irish literature from the medieval interval to 1900, and its improvement during the 20th century to the current day
  • Presents a re-visioning of twentieth-century Irish literature and a set of the main updated scholarship within the box as a complete
  • Includes a considerable variety of ladies writers from the eighteenth century to the current day
  • Includes essays on major modern authors, together with Brian Friel, Seamus Heaney, Eavan Boland, Roddy Doyle, and Emma Donoghue
  • Introduces readers to the big variety of present methods to learning Irish literature

Chapter 1 Tain Bo Cuailnge (pages 15–26): Ann Dooley
Chapter 2 Finn and the Fenian culture (pages 27–38): Joseph Falaky Nagy
Chapter three The Reception and Assimilation of Continental Literature (pages 39–56): Barbara Lisa Hillers
Chapter four Bardic Poetry, Masculinity, and the Politics of Male Homosociality (pages 57–75): Sarah E. McKibben
Chapter five Annalists and Historians in Early smooth eire, 1450–1700 (pages 76–91): Bernadette Cunningham
Chapter 6 “Hungry Eyes” and the Rhetoric of Dispossession: English Writing from Early smooth eire (pages 92–107): Patricia Palmer
Chapter 7 forms of Irishness: Henry Burnell and Richard Head (pages 108–124): Deana Rankin
Chapter eight Crossing Acts: Irish Drama from George Farquhar to Thomas Sheridan (pages 125–141): Helen M. Burke
Chapter nine Parnell and Early Eighteenth?Century Irish Poetry (pages 142–160): Andrew Carpenter
Chapter 10 Jonathan speedy and Eighteenth?Century eire (pages 161–177): Clement Hawes
Chapter eleven Merriman's Cuirt An Mheonoiche and Eighteenth?Century Irish Verse (pages 178–192): Liam P. O Murchu
Chapter 12 Frances Sheridan and eire (pages 193–209): Kathleen M. Oliver
Chapter thirteen “The Indigent Philosopher”: Oliver Goldsmith (pages 210–225): James Watt
Chapter 14 Edmund Burke (pages 226–242): Luke Gibbons
Chapter 15 The Drama of Richard Brinsley Sheridan (pages 243–258): Robert W. Jones
Chapter sixteen United Irish Poetry and Songs (pages 259–275): Mary Helen Thuente
Chapter 17 Maria Edgeworth and (Inter)national Intelligence (pages 276–291): Susan Manly
Chapter 18 Mary Tighe: A Portrait of the Artist for the Twenty?First Century (pages 292–309): Harriet Kramer Linkin
Chapter 19 Thomas Moore: After the conflict (pages 310–325): Jeffery Vail
Chapter 20 The function of the Political lady within the Writings of woman Morgan (Sydney Owenson) (pages 326–341): Susan B. Egenolf
Chapter 21 Charles Robert Maturin: Ireland's Eccentric Genius (pages 343–361): Robert Miles
Chapter 22 Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu: Gothic ugly and the Huguenot Inheritance (pages 362–376): Alison Milbank
Chapter 23 A Philosophical domestic Ruler: The Imaginary Geographies of Bram Stoker (pages 377–391): Lisa Hopkins
Chapter 24 Scribes and Storytellers: The Ethnographic mind's eye in Nineteenth?Century eire (pages 393–410): Stiofan O Cadhla
Chapter 25 Reconciliation and Emancipation: The Banims and Carleton (pages 411–426): Helen O'Connell
Chapter 26 Davis, Mangan, Ferguson: Irish Poetry, 1831–1849 (pages 427–443): Matthew Campbell
Chapter 27 the nice Famine in Literature, 1846–1896 (pages 444–459): Melissa Fegan
Chapter 28 Dion Boucicault: From degree Irishman to Staging Nationalism (pages 460–475): Scott Boltwood
Chapter 29 Oscar Wilde's Convictions, Speciesism, and the ache of Individualism (pages 476–490): Dennis Denisoff
Chapter 30 Cultural Nationalism and Irish Modernism (pages 17–34): Michael Mays
Chapter 31 Defining Irishness: Bernard Shaw and the Irish Connection at the English level (pages 35–49): Christopher Innes
Chapter 32 The Novels of Somerville and Ross (pages 50–65): Vera Kreilkamp
Chapter 33 W.B. Yeats and the Dialectics of Misrecognition (pages 66–82): Gregory Castle
Chapter 34 John Millington Synge – Playwright and Poet (pages 83–97): Ann Saddlemyer
Chapter 35 James Joyce and the construction of contemporary Irish Literature (pages 98–111): Michael Patrick Gillespie
Chapter 36 The be aware of Politics/Politics of the be aware: Immanence and Transdescendence in Sean O'Casey and Samuel Beckett (pages 113–128): Sandra Wynands
Chapter 37 Elizabeth Bowen: a house in Writing (pages 129–143): Eluned Summers?Bremner
Chapter 38 altering instances: Frank O'Connor and Sean O'Faolain (pages 144–158): Paul Delaney
Chapter 39 “Ireland is Small Enough”: Louis MacNeice and Patrick Kavanagh (pages 159–175): Alan Gillis
Chapter forty Irish Mimes: Flann O'Brien (pages 176–191): Joseph Brooker
Chapter forty-one studying William Trevor and discovering Protestant eire (pages 193–208): Gregory A. Schirmer
Chapter forty two The Mythopoeic eire of Edna O'Brien's Fiction (pages 209–223): Maureen O'Connor
Chapter forty three Anglo?Irish clash in Jennifer Johnston's Fiction (pages 224–233): Silvia Diez Fabre
Chapter forty four dwelling background: the significance of Julia O'Faolain's Fiction (pages 234–247): Christine St Peter
Chapter forty five keeping a replicate as much as a Society in Evolution: John McGahern (pages 248–262): Eamon Maher
Chapter forty six Brian Friel: From Nationalism to Post?Nationalism (pages 263–280): F. C. McGrath
Chapter forty seven Telling the reality Slant: The Poetry of Seamus Heaney (pages 281–295): Eugene O'Brien
Chapter forty eight Belfast Poets: Michael Longley, Derek Mahon, and Medbh McGuckian (pages 296–311): Richard Rankin Russell
Chapter forty nine Eilean Ni Chuilleanain's paintings of Witness (pages 312–327): Guinn Batten
Chapter 50 Eavan Boland's Muse moms (pages 328–344): Heather Clark
Chapter fifty one John Banville's Dualistic Universe (pages 345–359): Elke D'Hoker
Chapter fifty two among historical past and fable: The Irish motion pictures of Neil Jordan (pages 360–373): Brian McIlroy
Chapter fifty three “Keeping That Wound Green”: The Poetry of Paul Muldoon (pages 374–389): David Wheatley
Chapter fifty four Nuala Ni Dhomhnaill and the “Continuously modern” (pages 390–409): Frank Sewell
Chapter fifty five The anxiousness of impression and the Fiction of Roddy Doyle (pages 410–424): Danine Farquharson
Chapter fifty six The Reclamation of “Injurious phrases” in Emma Donoghue's Fiction (pages 425–435): Jennifer M. Jeffers
Chapter fifty seven Martin McDonagh and the Ethics of Irish Storytelling (pages 436–450): Patrick Lonergan

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Tristram (Eds). Early Irish Literature – Media and Communication / Mündlichkeit und Schriftlichkeit in der frühen irischen Literatur (pp. 201–20). Tübingen: G. Narr. Dooley, A. (2006). Playing the Hero: Reading the Irish Saga Táin Bó Cúailnge. Toronto: University of Toronto Press. Findon, J. (1998). A Woman’s Words: Emer and Female Speech in the Ulster Cycle. Toronto: University of Toronto Press. 26 Ann Dooley Greenwood, E. (1995). P. Mallory and G. Stockman (Eds). Ulidia: Proceedings of the First Conference on the Ulster Cycle of Tales, Belfast and Emain Macha, April 8–12, 1994 (pp.

London: Blackie & Son. Spenser, E. (1997). A View of the State of Ireland. A. Hadfield and W. Maley (Eds). Oxford: Blackwell. Tighe, M. (2005). The Collected Poems and Journals of Mary Tighe. K. Linkin (Ed). Lexington: University Press of Kentucky. M. (2008). Irish Literature, 1750–1900: An Anthology. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell. Part One The Middle Ages A Companion to Irish Literature, Volume One & Two Edited by Julia M. Wright © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd. ISBN: 978-1-405-18809-8 1 Táin Bó Cúailnge Ann Dooley The Táin Bó Cúailnge is the longest saga in the “Ulster cycle” of heroic tales and occupies a dominant place in medieval Irish literature tradition.

14 Julia M. J. (1997). Between Nations: Shakespeare, Spenser, Marvell, and the Question of Britain. Stanford: Stanford University Press. , S. Kilfeather, M. Luddy, et al. (2002). The Field Day Anthology of Irish Writing, vols. IV and V: Irish Women’s Writing and Traditions. Cork: Cork University Press. , A. Hadfield, and W. Maley (Eds). (1993). Representing Ireland: Literature and the Origins of the Conflict, 1534–1660. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Brown, T. (1975). Northern Voices: Poets from Ulster.

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