Download A Hindu Critique of Buddhist Epistemology: Kumarila on by John Taber PDF

By John Taber

This can be a translation of the bankruptcy on belief of Kumarilabhatta's magnum opus, the Slokavarttika, one of many critical texts of the Hindu reaction to the feedback of the logical-epistemological college of Buddhist proposal. In an in depth remark, the writer explains the process the argument from verse to verse and alludes to different theories of classical Indian philosophy and different technical issues. Notes to the interpretation and observation cross additional into the historic and philosophical history of Kumarila's principles. The booklet offers an creation to the heritage and the advance of Indian epistemology, a synopsis of Kumarila's paintings and an research of its argument.

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Read or Download A Hindu Critique of Buddhist Epistemology: Kumarila on Perception: The “Determination of Perception” chapter of Kumarila Bhatta’s Slokavarttika: Translation and commentary PDF

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Additional info for A Hindu Critique of Buddhist Epistemology: Kumarila on Perception: The “Determination of Perception” chapter of Kumarila Bhatta’s Slokavarttika: Translation and commentary

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And, again, in inference one must establish by perception the relation of the middle to the major term (“that which is to be proved,” s¯adhya). , “Everthing that has X has Dharma”) (98cd–99). Nor can supposition tell us anything useful about Dharma. Even if it could establish the existence of Dharma as the cause of varying experiences of pleasure and pain in life – that is, a particular person experiences a greater measure of pleasure than others because he lived according to Dharma in previous lives – which Kum¯arila disputes (for there could be other reasons for the discrepancies of misery and enjoyment among people) (101–104) – it still would not tell us which specific actions constitute Dharma, which is what we really need to know (105–108).

Am, literally, ‘that which pertains to each sense faculty’), because, once again, the functioning of a sense faculty is the factor in the arising of such an awareness not involved in the arising of other types of cognitions. Indeed, the mind, as the function that effectively turns on the sense faculty by establishing a connection with the self, and the self, as the subject of knowledge, are involved in the arising of all cognitions (129). Moreover, conceptualized perceptions are generally recognized as perceptions in common discourse.

He came to realize, however, that this was a grievous violation of Dharma, the sin of disrespecting one’s guru. To atone for this sin he vowed to bake himself to death in a pile of ´ nkara, pleading with him to live and write a comsmouldering refuse. 57 This story also may be taken as an indication of the great esteem in which Kum¯arila was held by philosophers of other schools. The lack of accurate knowledge of the history of Indian philosophy and, in particular, of the development of Kum¯arila’s own school, the P¯urva M¯ım¯am .

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